What did you have for breakfast yesterday and other ways to make learning stick

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Photo by Brooke Lark on Unsplash

If you are like me, one who eats the same breakfast everyday and has for years, answering this question is a no-brainer: Dannon coffee yogurt with sliced banana and a mix of Barbara’s cereals, Kashi, and someone’s granola (I’m a Gemini- I can’t have or choose just one cereal!).

But ask me what I did yesterday afternoon or evening or even what classes I taught, and I would have to dig deep and go through several associations to get to an answer: today is a P day, which means yesterday was I which means I saw fifth grade students; and since today is Friday,  yesterday was Thursday and we had a faculty meeting . . . You get the point.

I have talked about retrieval practice and Pooja Agarwal in recent posts here, here, and here and I have started implementing spaced retrieval practice with my students often at the beginning of class to do a quick check in of material and concepts we have discussed recently (and recently could be several days ago as I see students maybe once or twice in our 7-day rotation so they have to go deep into their memory reserve) to help make the learning stick.

Interleaving is a retrieval practice that mixes up what students need to know in order to solve a particular problem. It’s the “fruit salad” of learning. When students are solving problems that use the same formula or strategy, they are given “a false sense of mastery” because they can solve the problem, but they are solving a set of problems where they already know the strategy in advance. What interleaving does is mix up the concepts so that “students are forced to choose a strategy on the basis of the problem itself. This gives students a chance to both choose and use a strategy.”

The key to effective interleaving is to mix up similar topics, which encourages students to discriminate between similar ideas, concepts, and problems.

~Rohrer, Dedrick, Agarwal

To learn more about Interleaving and to get a Retrieval Practice Guide, click here. You can also look at their videos here. And, as if that were not enough, Pooja Agarwal will be the guest this Saturday- tomorrow- on Classroom 2.0’s Live webinar! Don’t worry if you cannot “attend” as the recording of this as well as all the others are there for your viewing pleasure when you are able to watch.

Speaking of watching, if you have not been watching Modern Learners webinars and podcasts, you should. I recently watched, then watched again, the podcast with Ted Dintersmith of “Most Likely to Succeed” and the new book, What Schools Could Be. I will leave you with this quote from the podcast,

“We prepare kids for the college application, not college.”

Mic drop.

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Photo by DESIGNECOLOGIST on Unsplash

After you watch the podcast, you can let me know what you think . .  .

 

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