Sharing with Wakelet

The other day I posted about the great things I learned even though I was not able to attend FallCue. There was so many great finds that I decided to split my weekly share into two separate posts. This is Part 2 and it comes to you via this Wakelet.  By the way, did I mention that you can share your Wakelet to your Google Classroom?!

 

CUEd Up!

The Fall CUE event was held this past weekend out in California, and while I was not there (I was happily visiting my son in Happy Valley),

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I was able to learn about many of the great presentations by following the hashtag #FallCUE.  It was there that I saw this tweet from Heather Marshall:

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Boy do I feel like I hit the jackpot!

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If you have read any of my previous blog posts, you know that I can be a serial clicker. I mean, I follow links to see what else there is. I’ll attribute it to my love of learning- my top character strength– and not an ability to be distracted as some might think.

So the first thing I looked at was Wakelet. Since Ms. Marshall thanked them for making her year, I thought I should see what that was about. First off, Wakelet allows you to create “collections” from the web that include pictures, social media posts, text, sound files, and links. What is more, you can explore  other peoples’ collections that you can then use in your classrooms (like this on Landfills, this on The New Silk Road, or this on Rube Goldberg machines), or for your own personal benefit (like this about Paris or this about Quinoa). You can quickly create your own free account, add the Wakelet Chrome extension, and begin saving websites and creating, embedding, and sharing your own collections from around the web!

Then I began combing through her FallCUE wakelet and WOW! First, you can see all the resources from numerous sessions here in this shared Google Drive folder. In it you will find presentation materials about Math, Writing, Coding, Digital Citizenship, more Math, Productivity, Work flow, HyerDocs and more! You will need time to look through it all but it will be worth it!

Speaking of HyperDocs, I opened this FallCUE multimedia text set and here is where it gets exciting! There are sample templates, resources for building MultiMedia Text Sets, links to content and more. Here are some fantastic things I found that connect with our curriculum while exploring:

  1. This Immigration HyperDoc
  2. Greek Mythology HyperDoc
  3. Lisa Highfill’s YouTube page filled with helpful videos with How Tos like how to create MMTS (Multi-Media Text Sets), HyperDocs explained, growth mindset, adding maps, and more. A veritable PD day on it’s own!
  4. A Padlet of HyperDocs created and shared during the HyperDocs online bootcamp. Here you will find HDs on Gilgamesh, Math, The Odyssey, To Kill a Mockingbird, Native Americans, Civil Rights, a Spanish one for Day of the Dead, and so many more!
  5. Common Lit a free site for educators that is both a digital library and instructional tool. You can choose texts, assign them to your students, and assess their reading at the same time. You can browse by book, genre, grade level, theme, literary device (from alliteration to internal conflict, symbolism, theme), or text set (including the American Colonies, Ancient Civilizations, Westward Expansion, Slavery, and more). Beginning in grade 3 and going through 12th grade, you will find a myriad of high-level texts and passages that you can begin using in your classroom as part of your reading program.

Ah, the power of Twitter and sharing and following the right people and hashtag! So, even though we may not have been at the event, we can still benefit from those who were through the resources they shared!

 

Resource-Full!

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This week I am sharing a little bit of this and a little bit of that. But first, apologies for the lack of sharing this past month. I have started a specialization through Coursera and have been trying to be efficient with my time, i.e.,  when I have it, I am using it to learn.

And now the shares!

Listen Up

I have listened to and read transcripts from several podcasts, TED talks, and articles the first of which is from The Cult of Pedagogy, aka Jennifer Gonzalez. Gonzalez shared how she is transforming her teaching and therefore student learning by incorporating what she learned when she began going to Crossfit workouts with her husband. Gonzalez shares four ways she has changed how she teaches based on the Crossfit methods. My personal favorites are the Differentiation and Student Choice, and Variety Matters. Who says all the students need to be doing the same things at the same time, and who says that you can’t switch things up in your classroom!

While I was browsing Gonzalez’s site, I came across her post about ways we as teachers can support students of color  which was inspired by Dena Simmons’ TED talk . Her post offers four ways Simmons suggests we can begin and continue to change our behaviors and our classrooms to honor and recognize all of our students, one of which is Create ways for students to bring pieces of their lives into the classroom.

If you teach middle or high school math or have children who are in these grades, then these Math tools Chrome Add-Ons are for you. Graphing calculators anyone??

This next was a BIG find! Thanks to Nicole Mancini who created this Author Connections Flipgrid, you and your (elementary) students can hear authors read aloud first chapters of their books, get writing advice, as well as hear the authors share their books and why you should choose to read them. It is a great resource for your budding writers and readers.

If you do anything on (in?) Chrome, then these Top 10 Must-Listen Google Teacher Tribe Podcasts are for you. From add-ons to Slides, Classroom Hacks to Special Education, there is a Must-Listen podcast for everyone that includes links to numerous resources. One of my faves is on different things you can do with Google Slides that go beyond presentations. Thanks Kasey Bell and Matt Miller for these resource-full podcasts!

It’s all about the search!

Sometimes I just get lucky and today was one of those days. I was looking for a Twitter template for a colleague and while I was searching, I came across some fantastic options. First is this list of results from a template search on Matt Miller’s DITCH That Textbook website. I knew he has written and shared about these before so his would be the first site I checked. And you know me, one click leads to another and I found Template Palooza. Take some time to browse the numerous options and then get your creative juices flowing for ways you and your students can do a deep dive into a character’s thoughts and motivations using these and other templates.

Next on the agenda

Lastly are some articles I have open and ready to read. While I have not read them yet, I am sharing them with you because I am sure they will be meaningful and thoughtful. First is an article on over-scheduling, next is on teaching students how to structure their thinking,  and last is on the importance of building relationships in our classrooms.

 

 

Ready, Set, Go!

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School has officially started. If you managed to miss seeing the school busses on the road, the obligatory first day of school pics on your favorite social media platform probably gave it away; not to mention the back to school meetings and classroom prep we have all been part of 😉

With the start of the school year come more great opportunities for you and your students to engage, connect, explore, and create. Here is what I have for you this week:

Breakout of your Centers and Gamify Your Classroom Content

This first share comes from a guest post on Matt Miller’s DITCH That Textbook blog. John Meehan shares how he uses games in his classroom to have students engage with novels in his 11th grade English classroom. Think of it as reverse of Breakout games that people are playing everywhere. Meehan shares templates, tips, and ideas that can be modified for use in middle or elementary classrooms.

Explore the Effects of Ocean Plastics

Explore by the Seat of Your Pants has a month’s worth of live lessons from Marine Biologists all over the world that you and your students can partake in from the comfort of your classroom. There are daily options with varying times so you can easily find one that is convenient for your classroom. Each lesson offers opportunities for classrooms to have a camera spot but if none are available, the lessons are streamed live on YouTube with a recordings library that is growing for later viewing. Can’t participate this month? Not to worry, there are events every month with different themes like conservation, space, exploration to choose from just to name a few.

Seesaw: Not Just for Playgrounds

If you are thinking about getting started with a fabulous portfolio tool for your classroom, Seesaw is offering September PD in your PJs. Seesaw is a tool that can be used within your browser or on a tablet and is a great way to make your students’ thinking visible. September PD in your PJs is a series of short webinars to get you started using Seesaw in your classroom whether you are an elementary, middle, or high school teacher. Each short webinar will show you not just how to get started, but also how you can use Seesaw in your PreK-2, 3-5, or 6-12 classroom. What are you waiting for!

Using Portfolios? Here are Self-Assessment Questions for Encouraging a Growth Mindset

We all understand the importance of encouraging our students to think with a growth mindset and to know that while they may not understand or “get” something right now, with practice and feedback, they will come to it in time. This post offers some great questions and prompts that you can have your students reflect on that will encourage them to think differently about their work. Use them as portfolio prompts or even as exit tickets at the end of a project.

What’s New in Classroom

If you are using Google Classroom, then you might have seen the updates and changes. Here is a list of what’s new and improved to make your workflow even simpler. You can read the full blog post here.

 

“It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year”

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If you are singing the song and thinking about the holidays, then you are partially correct. While this is not a post about the winter holidays as it is only nearly September, it is a post that brings “gifts”. These gifts, however, are in the form of great tools you can use and connections you can make right off the bat for the new school year ahead!

First off is the All New Educator’s Guide to Flipgrid 3.0. In early August, Fligrid launched a slew of updates including making it FREE to educators everywhere! Now you and your students can share your voices, connect with other classrooms, become epals, and co-pilot topics safely, securely, and easily. Just imagine using Flipgrid on one of the first days of school for students to share something they want you to know about them, goals for the start of the year, or a favorite poem.

Speaking of sharing, flattening classroom walls, and connecting, the 2018 Global Read Aloud will kickoff in just over a month on October 1. Join with over a million other students and teachers in reading one of this year’s selections.  Then use Flipgrid to share reflections, favorite passages, and messages about the book with other classrooms from around the globe.

Richard Byrne has recently released his Practical Ed Tech Handbook for the 2018-2019 School Year that you are free to view, download, and use in your classroom and schools. In it you will find tips for staying in touch with parents and students, ways to use online quiz platforms, tools for making stop-motion and documentary-style videos, and more.

As my school continues our implementation of Positive Education under the Positive Psychology umbrella, and schools are realizing the importance of promoting and facilitating a growth mindset in their learners and faculty, Learn Storm and Khan Academy offer these growth mindset lessons and activities for elementary, middle, and high school students that you can utilize with your free Khan Academy account.

Day one is coming or for some is already here. Here are three options for one-minute of retrievals from Pooja Agarwal you can use with your students to get them primed and ready to learn. These are simple, quick warm-ups you can easily implement that are research-based ways to deepen your students’ learning. You can subscribe for weekly updates, read about the research and download free guides and follow Agarwal on Twitter.

Lastly, while you are setting up your classrooms, taking a walk in the beautiful weather, or just like to listen to learn, then take a few (usually hovering around 5 – 10) minutes to listen to Matt Miller’s DITCH podcast. This will take you to a podcast about more ways to use Quizizz and if you scroll down, you can hear about Fliphunts (a mash up of Flipgrid and a scavenger hunt), changes to Google Classroom, Educator Goals and more.

Slow Jog to the Finish Line

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The end of the school year is coming. I know this because the calendar says so. I also know this because the weather is finally looking and feeling like summer. And yet, as far as the work goes, we are still in the thick of it. So since we are still working, I will do one final share of resources and articles until we return from summer break.

7 out of 10 adults say they experience stress or anxiety everyday

First is somethingShawn Achor shared on Twitter.  Achor wrote The Happiness Advantage which we are reading as part of our positive education implementation. But honestly, if you interact with other people in any way, this is a book you might want to read regardless. You can read more about the book here in our ShipleyReads blog. This post from Happify is titled, How to beat stress and boost happiness. I feel like this is something we all could use at times and Happify has created a lovely infographic that offers numerous science-based suggestions that are easy to do.

“I don’t do math.”

Next up is a year’s worth (probably more) of materials from Jo Boaler that will enhance your teaching towards a growth mindset. The first is the mathematical mindsets teaching guide, teaching resources, and teaching videos. Next, if you have not browsed YouCubed’s site, you might want to get started. There is a wealth of material there including lessons, resources, articles, videos, and learning opportunities. It is really a treasure trove for those who teach or work with students. And for fun, an article from Stanford Magazine, Jo Boaler Wants Everyone to Love Math.

“You can’t get to the content if the relationship and the social-emotional well-being piece is not being attended to first,” 

If you boiled down positive psychology to just three words, they would be “Other people matter.” This next article, “The Power of Teacher Student Relationships to Boost Learning” highlights the importance of relationships between teachers and students to student learning. 

Consequences of Passive Learning = memorization without engagement

Continuing along the lines of how students learn best is this robust post, 102 Brain-Based Learning Resources for Brain-Based Teaching. This is basically a psych major’s dream list. There is A LOT here beginning with research. If you scroll down you will see a list of Brain and Learning Blogs including Brain Rules (which was one of our all school reading books) and Judy Willis’ R.A.D. Teach blog. Judy gave a two-day professional development at our school a number back in 2010 and I still remember the strategies she suggested to help the information stick. Towards the end of the article, you will find General Brain-based Learning Resources. 

I hope you have found these posts useful and that you will come back for new ones in the fall. Until then, I will repost some of the more popular posts from the archives!

 

A Teaching Buffet: Something for Everyone

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Photo by Dan Gold on Unsplash

Some might say that I am a hoarder. But not like the ones that you see on Buried Alive. I am more of a “tabs” hoarder. I have shared this tendency before: I tend to keep lots of tabs open until I really have time to dive in. Of course I could use my One Tab extension and place them in a single, “save for later” tab, but alas, I do not. I like to leave them where I can see them until I am ready to dig in.

So today is the day I am wading through my tabs so that I can share them with you.

First off is Peer Teaching options from the Teaching Channel. One of the best ways to know if your students understand a topic or concept is to have them teach another student. So in this menu of videos from the Teaching Channel, you will find several options to use peer teaching in your class from appetizers to dessert.

Next is a “Wow!” It is a collection of digital history projects for use in grades 9-12 but some can be widened to include 6th -12th. What first led me to this was my looking for resources to use with our fourth grade students in their study of slavery as they prepare to read Jefferson’s Sons. I found this post from The Global History Educator that really is a WOW for history teachers. Included are 12 digital history projects that include The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database, Mapping the 4th of July, Back Story, and nine more incredible resources to use right now in history classes as a resource for you and your students.

The next two are from Matt Miller of DITCH Homework and DITCH Textbook fame. The first is several ways to end the year with GSuite tools and the next is 10 Things Teachers Should Know About the New Google Sites. Personally I love the new Google Sites and find it very easy to use. While I miss the sharing options for individual pages, I think the new drag and drop interface makes up for it until they hopefully bring that piece back.

I have written before about Jo Boaler and the other day I came across this video where she introduced Polyups. Never being one to pass up on anything from Jo Boaler, I took a look. After I figured out how they work, I was hooked and your students will be too. Polyups is a computational math thinking playground for students in grades 3 through 12 and covers Number Sense, Operations, Order of Operations, Problem Solving in 3rd -5th; Functions, Sequences, Logical Thinking, Algorithmic Thinking in 6th-8th; and Series, Numerical Methods, Calculus, Algorithms in 9th -12th. You can take a look at their videos here.

I learned about this next site on Twitter. Taste Atlas is just that– a world map of foods. I just finished reading Americanah and Jollof of Rice was one of the dishes Ifemelu (main character) mentioned several times. Taste Atlas has Jollof of Rice on Nigeria since it is a national dish. Once you click on a food or search a country, you will get foods of the region, where you can find the best of it, and recipes, and more. Interestingly enough, when I searched Florence, Italy (since I was recently there and my son is there studying abroad) one of the places they mentioned as best places to eat is the pizza place my son raves about, Gusta Pizza. Pretty cool.

Class Pad is a free digital math tool that makes solving math problems on the computer as easy as click, type, draw, and solve. It’s your digital scratch paper with built-in calculator that I can see teachers using along with Screencastify to make tutorial videos and your students doing the same to show how they solve problems. One of the cool aspects of Class Pad is the ability of Class Pad to recognize your geometrical figures that you draw and turn them into sharp figures (unless you draw a circle- no sharp lines there!). Subscribe to their YouTube channel where they will be adding more videos as they create them.

For more great articles, tools, tips, and videos, check out this week’s Shipley PLN Lower & Middle School Edition.