A Chance to Be Part of History, Herstory, & Ourstory

Great learning opportunities are coming your way! If you are a history or social studies teacher, The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History’s teacher seminars series is open now for applications. What is the Gilder Lehrman Institute you ask? They are a non-profit organization whose mission is “to promote the knowledge and understanding of American history through educational programs and resources.” You can read a previous post about Gilder Lehrman here.

To learn about their online courses, click here.

For information about this year’s teacher summer seminars, click here.

To apply, click here.

Neither a history or social studies teacher ? Feeling left out of the learning? Not to worry, you can learn everyday from December 14-31 form the comfort of your own sofa or classroom being part of the DITCHSummit. For more information, you can see my previous post.

NINE Days of Learning Coming Your Way #DITCHSummit

Image from Pixabay

Friends, it’s almost here: The 2018 DITCH Summit is two weeks away and with that will come NINE fabulous presenters that will leave you pumped, energized, motivated, and armed with tools, tips, and ideas that you can start using right away with your students! You can sign up here.

Beginning December 14th and daily through December 31st you will receive your daily gift of learning in your inbox along with all the accompanying materials for the day’s presentation.

This year’s schedule for the 2018 DITCHSummit:

December 14 (Fri) — How Students Are Using Technology to Change the World (Ken Shelton, Disruptor, Keynote Speaker, Techquity Voice)

December 15 (Sat) — Building Relationships and Communicating with Students (Kim Bearden, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Ron Clark Academy)

December 16 (Sun) — Six Practical Ways to Amplify Learning with Technology (Matt Miller, Head Textbook Ditcher, Ditch That Textbook)

December 17 (Mon) — Appsmashing Your Way to Redefinition (Jornea Erwin, Head of Educator Innovation, Flipgrid)

December 18 (Tue) — Infusing Coding in Any Class (Bryan Miller, Co-Founder, TopTechEDU, Director of Education Strategy, Wonder Workshop)

December 19 (Wed) — Fantastic Learning Activities with Google Drawings (Tony Vincent, 5th grade teacher / LearningInHand.com)

December 20 (Thur) — Using Visual Thinking to Unlock Powerful Learning (Manuel Herrera, doodler and visual thinker)

December 21 (Fri) — Sparking Student Creativity and Creation with Video (Claudio Zavala, video/creativity/storytelling enthusiast)

 If you are curious about DITCHSummit, you can read my posts from the previous years here, here, and here, and I promise you will be happy that you did!

This Week’s Purpose

“A purpose can increase your persistence for what you do.” ~Angela Duckworth

My purpose in writing these posts is to share great things I find with my colleagues and others who might not have the time to read and sort through all that is out there. I made it my purpose when I started my current job 11 years ago. As I was learning about great things, I wanted to share them with others. When inviting people to my room did not work, I made a wiki (now defunct and the resources live here). Then I started making video messages and posting them to my wiki. And then to share what I had added to my wiki, I started this blog. So, please enjoy today’s purpose below!

Have you checked out Nearpod lately? There are a ton of free lessons on all subjects in both English and Spanish. Just doing a quick filter for free lessons in grades 2-8, I found ice breakers, lessons on social emotional learning, a lesson on Harriet Tubman, the Great Wall of China, lessons on different writing styles, Chemistry, and The Declaration of Independence. Of course if you were to look, you could filter more specifically for your grade and subject and you are bound to find at least one lesson that you could use right away with your students. Nearpod lessons include text, images, drawings, video, and more and what they all do is allow your whole class to participate and interact with the content at the same time and on their own screen. You can create your own lessons, use one from another teacher, or a combination of the the two.

Next is a post from Matt Miller on In ‘n Out Burger. Well, it’s not really on In ‘n Out Burger because Matt always shares tools and tips we can use. His post is about the secret menus that are out there that we might not know to ask about (which makes sense if they are secret). Anyway, in his post, Miller shares things about Google Slides that we might not know about and that are really helpful once we hear about them. My personal favorites are the paint roller (which, to be honest, I still need more time to play with) and the set as background option for things you don’t want your students moving when you create and share templates with them. Of course, the captions are pretty cool too but you will have to check out the post to see what I am talking about.

You might remember that over the last couple years I have shared posts about the DITCH Summit (that link is to last year’s summit post) that happens in December. Well, December is soon upon us and for nine days there will be another FREE virtual DITCH Summit for you to get your learning on. These are always worthwhile, always thought-provoking, and always motivating. The best part is that you can watch the videos when it works for you during the summit. A new video and supporting materials is posted each day during the nine days BUT when it’s over, it’s over. So, sign up

Learn and Collaborate from the Comfort of Your Classroom

anthonyjdangelo1-2xI love to learn. It’s a true statement. When I get hooked on a topic, I just want to keep learning more about it. I also love to share my learning with others which is why I write these posts and send my colleagues and friends lots of emails whenever I find something that might be of interest to them. It’s why I share on Twitter. This week I am sharing a few things that I think may be of interest or use to you.

Learn

One of the things I love to learn about is learning- specifically what aids in learning. From the first time Judy Willis presented to us about the reticular activating system, I have been fascinated about this topic. I still have camp friends who remember a talk I gave about the health center (back when running the health center was my job) because of the way I made not-so-subtle changes before I said something important I wanted them to remember. Pooja Agarwal and her site, Retrieval Practice, offer numerous research and evidence-based resources and strategies for learning about which I have written several times before. On November 5 from 3 – 4PM, Agarwal, a cognitive scientist, and Patrice Bain, a veteran teacher/education specialist, along with Allison Shell, author and research fellow,  are presenting at a free webinar titled, Unleash the Science of Learning, where  they will share and discuss evidence-based learning practices you can use in your classroom.  I have signed up to participate and will share what I learn and hope some of you will do the same.

Just clicking around through some of the links provided in the webinar’s description led me to some fantastic resources like these:

  1.  learner factors that influence math success and strategies to help build lessons that support these different math PK-2 learners or
  2. the factors that influence reading from the Learner Variability Project.
  3. and this Practice Guide for Organizing Instruction and Study to Improve Learning.

Collaborate

How many miles can you travel around the world in 24 hours?

On November 13-14, Microsoft and Skype in the Classroom is hosting a Skype-a-Thon to support quality education for children around the world. For every 400 virtual miles traveled, Microsoft will support educational resources for children in need. There are many classrooms and experts waiting to connect with you and your students. You can check out the different collaborations here. While browsing, I came across several that relate to our sustainability initiative like this on the ewaste movement,  this on plastic pollution, and this on managing garbage. There are many more on all matter of topics and subjects that you can search by age group, subject, and location.

In the effort to keep things short and sweet, I will stop here. Happy learning!

Sharing with Wakelet

The other day I posted about the great things I learned even though I was not able to attend FallCue. There was so many great finds that I decided to split my weekly share into two separate posts. This is Part 2 and it comes to you via this Wakelet.  By the way, did I mention that you can share your Wakelet to your Google Classroom?!

 

CUEd Up!

The Fall CUE event was held this past weekend out in California, and while I was not there (I was happily visiting my son in Happy Valley),

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I was able to learn about many of the great presentations by following the hashtag #FallCUE.  It was there that I saw this tweet from Heather Marshall:

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Boy do I feel like I hit the jackpot!

cards casino chance chip

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

If you have read any of my previous blog posts, you know that I can be a serial clicker. I mean, I follow links to see what else there is. I’ll attribute it to my love of learning- my top character strength– and not an ability to be distracted as some might think.

So the first thing I looked at was Wakelet. Since Ms. Marshall thanked them for making her year, I thought I should see what that was about. First off, Wakelet allows you to create “collections” from the web that include pictures, social media posts, text, sound files, and links. What is more, you can explore  other peoples’ collections that you can then use in your classrooms (like this on Landfills, this on The New Silk Road, or this on Rube Goldberg machines), or for your own personal benefit (like this about Paris or this about Quinoa). You can quickly create your own free account, add the Wakelet Chrome extension, and begin saving websites and creating, embedding, and sharing your own collections from around the web!

Then I began combing through her FallCUE wakelet and WOW! First, you can see all the resources from numerous sessions here in this shared Google Drive folder. In it you will find presentation materials about Math, Writing, Coding, Digital Citizenship, more Math, Productivity, Work flow, HyerDocs and more! You will need time to look through it all but it will be worth it!

Speaking of HyperDocs, I opened this FallCUE multimedia text set and here is where it gets exciting! There are sample templates, resources for building MultiMedia Text Sets, links to content and more. Here are some fantastic things I found that connect with our curriculum while exploring:

  1. This Immigration HyperDoc
  2. Greek Mythology HyperDoc
  3. Lisa Highfill’s YouTube page filled with helpful videos with How Tos like how to create MMTS (Multi-Media Text Sets), HyperDocs explained, growth mindset, adding maps, and more. A veritable PD day on it’s own!
  4. A Padlet of HyperDocs created and shared during the HyperDocs online bootcamp. Here you will find HDs on Gilgamesh, Math, The Odyssey, To Kill a Mockingbird, Native Americans, Civil Rights, a Spanish one for Day of the Dead, and so many more!
  5. Common Lit a free site for educators that is both a digital library and instructional tool. You can choose texts, assign them to your students, and assess their reading at the same time. You can browse by book, genre, grade level, theme, literary device (from alliteration to internal conflict, symbolism, theme), or text set (including the American Colonies, Ancient Civilizations, Westward Expansion, Slavery, and more). Beginning in grade 3 and going through 12th grade, you will find a myriad of high-level texts and passages that you can begin using in your classroom as part of your reading program.

Ah, the power of Twitter and sharing and following the right people and hashtag! So, even though we may not have been at the event, we can still benefit from those who were through the resources they shared!

 

Resource-Full!

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

This week I am sharing a little bit of this and a little bit of that. But first, apologies for the lack of sharing this past month. I have started a specialization through Coursera and have been trying to be efficient with my time, i.e.,  when I have it, I am using it to learn.

And now the shares!

Listen Up

I have listened to and read transcripts from several podcasts, TED talks, and articles the first of which is from The Cult of Pedagogy, aka Jennifer Gonzalez. Gonzalez shared how she is transforming her teaching and therefore student learning by incorporating what she learned when she began going to Crossfit workouts with her husband. Gonzalez shares four ways she has changed how she teaches based on the Crossfit methods. My personal favorites are the Differentiation and Student Choice, and Variety Matters. Who says all the students need to be doing the same things at the same time, and who says that you can’t switch things up in your classroom!

While I was browsing Gonzalez’s site, I came across her post about ways we as teachers can support students of color  which was inspired by Dena Simmons’ TED talk . Her post offers four ways Simmons suggests we can begin and continue to change our behaviors and our classrooms to honor and recognize all of our students, one of which is Create ways for students to bring pieces of their lives into the classroom.

If you teach middle or high school math or have children who are in these grades, then these Math tools Chrome Add-Ons are for you. Graphing calculators anyone??

This next was a BIG find! Thanks to Nicole Mancini who created this Author Connections Flipgrid, you and your (elementary) students can hear authors read aloud first chapters of their books, get writing advice, as well as hear the authors share their books and why you should choose to read them. It is a great resource for your budding writers and readers.

If you do anything on (in?) Chrome, then these Top 10 Must-Listen Google Teacher Tribe Podcasts are for you. From add-ons to Slides, Classroom Hacks to Special Education, there is a Must-Listen podcast for everyone that includes links to numerous resources. One of my faves is on different things you can do with Google Slides that go beyond presentations. Thanks Kasey Bell and Matt Miller for these resource-full podcasts!

It’s all about the search!

Sometimes I just get lucky and today was one of those days. I was looking for a Twitter template for a colleague and while I was searching, I came across some fantastic options. First is this list of results from a template search on Matt Miller’s DITCH That Textbook website. I knew he has written and shared about these before so his would be the first site I checked. And you know me, one click leads to another and I found Template Palooza. Take some time to browse the numerous options and then get your creative juices flowing for ways you and your students can do a deep dive into a character’s thoughts and motivations using these and other templates.

Next on the agenda

Lastly are some articles I have open and ready to read. While I have not read them yet, I am sharing them with you because I am sure they will be meaningful and thoughtful. First is an article on over-scheduling, next is on teaching students how to structure their thinking,  and last is on the importance of building relationships in our classrooms.