When Opportunity Comes Knocking . . .

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“Teachers open doors, but you must enter by yourself” ~Chinese Proverb

 

When I was trying to come up with a title for this post, I thought about what kinds of things I was sharing. I realized that much of it, while presented as tips, tools, and readings, are really opportunities. Opportunities for our own learning, opportunities for our students’ learning, and opportunities to try something new.

Opportunity #1

I am excited that the Innovator’s Mindset Massive Open Online Course or #IMMOOC for short, is offering another opportunity for us to learn together as it is coming back for round 4. Whereas rounds 1-3 revolved around the reading and discussing of Couros‘ fantastic, thought-provoking book, The Innovator’s Mindset, this round includes two additional books to choose from: Katie Martin’s, Learner-Centered Innovation and A.J. Juliani and John Spencer‘s Empower. I loved participating in the previous round and looked forward to each week’s live video session as well as the weekly Twitter chat. If you would like to learn more about the previous round, you can read about it here.  This is a learning opportunity you will not want to miss.

Opportunity #2

This next opportunity is for World Language Teachers. Eric Curts always has great resources to share and this is no different. In his post, he shares 5 tools for increasing your students’ fluency with the target language including one that you probably had not thought to use this way. One of my colleagues has been using Google Hangouts with her students and she loves the authenticity of the conversations.

Opportunity #3

Equally as fantastic is this opportunity from Shake Up Learning to enhance your teaching life:  50 apps/sites that integrate with Google Classroom. As many of you know and can attest, Google Classroom makes your workflow that much smoother with your students. Having apps that integrate with Google Classroom makes using those sites even easier with their share to classroom option. I have personally used the Flipgrid, PBS Learning Media, Padlet, Nearpod,and Screencastify, as well as the Share to Google Classroom extension (which anyone who is using Classroom should immediately install) and find the integration to be seamless. It is really as easy as click, share, choose class, done!

Opportunity #4

While browsing the above post, I saw an opportunity to learn about a new resource and clicked on a site I had not heard of before– Open Ed. Open Ed is resources for teachers and students K-12 including videos, assessments, homework, lesson plans, interactives, and more. You can search by key word, grade, type of resource, standard, or school subject. Once you get your results, you can then share them with your students by printing or sharing to Google Classroom. If you create your free account, then you can create a class and assign things to your students individually, in groups, or as a whole class (similar to your options for assignments in Google Classroom). Your teacher dashboard shows you what you have assigned, what your students complete, how they did, and then offers specific additional resources for each student for each question they need more help with which you can then assign to those students. Talk about differentiation! Pop over to Open Ed to check out what they have to offer; you will not be disappointed!

Opportunity #5

This last site is an opportunity to engage your reluctant or struggling readers. A few weeks ago I heard about this next site and am excited to share it. Storyshares is a site dedicated to pairing books with struggling or disengaged readers that are compelling, age appropriate, and at the same time, are at their reading level. You can read about StoryShares here. What is great about Storyshares is it’s interactivity. You can search by interest level (late elementary through post high school), reading level (Fountas and Pinnell), or grade level (K-5). These are books written specifically to address the need for high interest and relevant books for those whose reading level is not the same as their age and maturity level. It’s really a win-win for everyone involved.

photo credit: PMillera4 Two Doors via photopin (license)

“Don’t Know Much About History . . . “

36404305214_75847ae915_n. . . but you will if you follow these links!

Recently I have been working with a colleague who teaches history in middle school. She is starting to teach a new unit on Civics and she and I have been sitting together to make some interactive, blended lessons. We have had a great time working on these lessons and are in the process of starting our third set of Civics HyperDocs that incorporate videos, readings from icivics, and check-ins using edpuzzle and Google docs.

While searching around, I came upon a treasure trove of resources that will make any history or social studies teacher swoon.

First is the Civics Renewal Network with resources for teachers from K-12 that you can filter by resource type, subject, issue, grade, Constitutional Amendment, and teaching method- yes, you can filter by individual, whole class, project-based, and more!

Next is the Annenberg Classroom that has everything you could possibly need to teach civics and the Constitution including games, timelines, lesson plans, links to other civics sites for teachers, discussion guides, today in history, and current events.

I happened upon the next site (60-second civics- see below) while browsing this Foundations and Formations of Government HyperDoc which I found from this link in the April 2017 section of this collection of Social Studies resources that Eric Curts has crowd-sourced and updates monthly. If his name sounds familiar, you may recall I shared some of his other resources here.

60-Second Civics is a daily one-minute podcast on topics related to civics, our government, and issues around the Constitution. 60-Second Civics is housed on the Center for Civic Education website. Here you will find lesson plans for K-12 like this middle school lesson, Why do we need authority?  as well as lessons on Voting, Women’s History, early Presidents, the Constitution, and much more.

The next place happens to be right in our backyard which is lucky for us who live in or near Philly. The Constitution Center happens to also have numerous resources on their site including interactive games, crafts, historical documents, lesson plans, and a host of other amazing resources like these videos.

Common Sense Media has this list of 13 Best Websites and Games for US History and Civics that includes links to PBS Learning Media (you know I love this site!), History Pin, Mission US (my third grade students play the immigration game during their Ellis Island unit) and 10 others for you and your students.

Teaching History has teaching materials for elementary through high school as well as quizzes, links to national resources, an Ask an Historian section, searchable multi-media that includes dramatic readings, podcasts, walking tours, and yada, yada, yada– you’ll have to visit to see the rest!

Happy learning!

photo credit: vandentroost old books via photopin (license)