Back to School with a Growth Mindset

swing-playground-recess-school

“There is a difference between not knowing and not knowing YET” ~Sheila Tobias

Welcome back to what I hope will be a positive school year for everyone. I have collected some posts that I think will help you make this year of learning in your classroom memorable for you and your students.

First off is a post from esteemed educator, George Couros titled, 5 Questions to Ask Your Students to Start the School Year, one of them being, “What are your strengths and how can we utilize them?” In his post he emphasizes how the impact our experiences with our students helps shape their thoughts and reflections and memories of school. Coming off our school’s recent Positive Psychology/Positive Education retreat, we know that positive psychology is about recognizing that “Other People Matter” and if we keep this at the forefront of our mind, we can hope to positively shape and influence our students’ experiences for the better. This involves how we listen to, respond, speak to, and engage with our students. To see the rest of the questions Couros suggests, click here.

The next is from Khan Academy and it ties in with positive psychology’s emphasis on Growth Mindset. Khan Academy has partnered with PERTS, a Stanford-based research group that includes Carol Dweck, Joe Boaler and others. They have created a series of lessons on growth mindset for students ranging from third through twelfth grade as part of their LearnStorm activities (What is Learnstorm- watch here). Within each of the six growth mindset activities, you will find readings, videos, reflection prompts, and more. You can do the activities one per week over six weeks, or whatever works for your classroom. For more information on how a third grade teacher used the lessons with his classroom, you can watch this recording.

I have posted about this next tool before here and here, but with so many new features as well as the opportunities it affords to learn your students’ stories, thoughts, reflections, and connect with others around the world, it bears mentioning again. Flipgrid is the easiest way to have your students create video responses to your prompts which with the wide array of amazing new features (yes, I have said it again because they are really that great) includes text, video, image, or uploaded document prompts.

The final share is a two-part post on bell-ringer activities from Matt Miller of DITCH Textbook fame. I have previously written about him here and here and several other mentions. In his two-part post he offers 20 digital ways to kick off your class and hook your students into each learning experience to make their learning memorable. Some of my favorite ideas are the QR code on the board, a What If Flipgrid , tweeting for someone, blackout poetry, and s- (to see the rest and figure out what I was about to say, visit 10 digital bell-ringer activities to kickstart class and 10 MORE digital bell ringer activities to kickstart class.

Photo credit: Foter.com

Advertisements

A Handful of Spring Sharing

6393548853It has been quite a busy six weeks and unfortunately, my blogging had to take a backseat. While I did share my learning from a recent Coursera course, I have not shared any tips, tricks, or articles since February. My apologies. Time to move on!

As per usual, I have numerous tabs open so here we go:

#1. A great post from Rick Wormeli (I have recently referenced him here) titled, “43 Things We Need to Stop Doing in Schools” .  This list is certainly not exhaustive. I feel pretty strongly about #s 2, 3, 5, 13, 18, 26, & 30; how about you?

#2 This next piece is fun, one you and your students will enjoy being creative with and sharing learning, and it uses something you probably already have. Intrigued? Many kids (and grown-ups) love making stop motion animation but did you know you could do it in Google Slides? This video shared by Daniel Kaufman to our Google Education Group shows how you can use Google Slides to make Stop Motion animation video. Kaufman shows how to solve an algebra problem and uses 88 slides to do it. I played around and made one using just 10 (see below). The key as you will see in his video, is to use the “duplicate slide” option.

 

#3 Since we are talking about things you can do with Google Slides, I thought I would remind you of two Chrome extensions I posted about before- Save to Drive and Drive Slides. You can combine the capabilities of these the Drive Slides extension with the Stop Motion capability of Slides for one really cool presentation. #ThingsThatMakeYouGoHmmm

#4 I have shared my excitement about HyperDocs in previous posts so when I saw this Padlet of HyperDocs posted on Twitter, I knew I needed to share it with you. I am certain there will be something you can use/modify in your classroom, then you can visit the teachers give teachers site for more inspiration! Click here to learn even more about HyperDocs.

#5 Think you are a smarty pants? How about your students? What about Smarty Pins? This next share is about another favorite of mine– Google– and it is “21 Google Tools That You Probably Never Heard Of”. OK, maybe you know that you can search for a stopwatch and Google will pull up their stopwatch function, or maybe you knew that you could type in an algebraic equation and Google would solve it for you and show the interactive graph (#3); perhaps you even knew you could do a reverse image search (#4), and create a story using Story Builder (#9); but did you know about Smarty Pins, an interactive mapping search game (#7) or Spell Up, a spelling game (#18)? Check out this post to see what else you can do with Google.

#6 Last but certainly not least is a great tool for making student learning visible. Flipgrid is simple, easy-to-use, and made for teachers and students from elementary school through high school. You can sign up, set up, and begin using your Flipgrid in about five minutes. I recently used Flipgrid to have my students reflect on a Tynker coding project they did and the responses were fantastic and honest. You can use it to have a whole class respond to text prompt or quote, share their strategies to solving a math problem, reflect on their work, and so much more. Flipgrid gives every student a chance to share their voice and respond, not just the ones who like to speak out in class. You can make your Flipgrids private or public, and you can moderate your topic so that students cannot see each other’s responses until you have viewed them.

For more great articles, videos, and tools, you can read this week’s Shipley PLN Lower & Middle School Edition.

Happy Spring!