Learn and Collaborate from the Comfort of Your Classroom

anthonyjdangelo1-2xI love to learn. It’s a true statement. When I get hooked on a topic, I just want to keep learning more about it. I also love to share my learning with others which is why I write these posts and send my colleagues and friends lots of emails whenever I find something that might be of interest to them. It’s why I share on Twitter. This week I am sharing a few things that I think may be of interest or use to you.

Learn

One of the things I love to learn about is learning- specifically what aids in learning. From the first time Judy Willis presented to us about the reticular activating system, I have been fascinated about this topic. I still have camp friends who remember a talk I gave about the health center (back when running the health center was my job) because of the way I made not-so-subtle changes before I said something important I wanted them to remember. Pooja Agarwal and her site, Retrieval Practice, offer numerous research and evidence-based resources and strategies for learning about which I have written several times before. On November 5 from 3 – 4PM, Agarwal, a cognitive scientist, and Patrice Bain, a veteran teacher/education specialist, along with Allison Shell, author and research fellow,  are presenting at a free webinar titled, Unleash the Science of Learning, where  they will share and discuss evidence-based learning practices you can use in your classroom.  I have signed up to participate and will share what I learn and hope some of you will do the same.

Just clicking around through some of the links provided in the webinar’s description led me to some fantastic resources like these:

  1.  learner factors that influence math success and strategies to help build lessons that support these different math PK-2 learners or
  2. the factors that influence reading from the Learner Variability Project.
  3. and this Practice Guide for Organizing Instruction and Study to Improve Learning.

Collaborate

How many miles can you travel around the world in 24 hours?

On November 13-14, Microsoft and Skype in the Classroom is hosting a Skype-a-Thon to support quality education for children around the world. For every 400 virtual miles traveled, Microsoft will support educational resources for children in need. There are many classrooms and experts waiting to connect with you and your students. You can check out the different collaborations here. While browsing, I came across several that relate to our sustainability initiative like this on the ewaste movement,  this on plastic pollution, and this on managing garbage. There are many more on all matter of topics and subjects that you can search by age group, subject, and location.

In the effort to keep things short and sweet, I will stop here. Happy learning!

Slow Jog to the Finish Line

people doing marathon

Photo by Snapwire on Pexels.com

The end of the school year is coming. I know this because the calendar says so. I also know this because the weather is finally looking and feeling like summer. And yet, as far as the work goes, we are still in the thick of it. So since we are still working, I will do one final share of resources and articles until we return from summer break.

7 out of 10 adults say they experience stress or anxiety everyday

First is somethingShawn Achor shared on Twitter.  Achor wrote The Happiness Advantage which we are reading as part of our positive education implementation. But honestly, if you interact with other people in any way, this is a book you might want to read regardless. You can read more about the book here in our ShipleyReads blog. This post from Happify is titled, How to beat stress and boost happiness. I feel like this is something we all could use at times and Happify has created a lovely infographic that offers numerous science-based suggestions that are easy to do.

“I don’t do math.”

Next up is a year’s worth (probably more) of materials from Jo Boaler that will enhance your teaching towards a growth mindset. The first is the mathematical mindsets teaching guide, teaching resources, and teaching videos. Next, if you have not browsed YouCubed’s site, you might want to get started. There is a wealth of material there including lessons, resources, articles, videos, and learning opportunities. It is really a treasure trove for those who teach or work with students. And for fun, an article from Stanford Magazine, Jo Boaler Wants Everyone to Love Math.

“You can’t get to the content if the relationship and the social-emotional well-being piece is not being attended to first,” 

If you boiled down positive psychology to just three words, they would be “Other people matter.” This next article, “The Power of Teacher Student Relationships to Boost Learning” highlights the importance of relationships between teachers and students to student learning. 

Consequences of Passive Learning = memorization without engagement

Continuing along the lines of how students learn best is this robust post, 102 Brain-Based Learning Resources for Brain-Based Teaching. This is basically a psych major’s dream list. There is A LOT here beginning with research. If you scroll down you will see a list of Brain and Learning Blogs including Brain Rules (which was one of our all school reading books) and Judy Willis’ R.A.D. Teach blog. Judy gave a two-day professional development at our school a number back in 2010 and I still remember the strategies she suggested to help the information stick. Towards the end of the article, you will find General Brain-based Learning Resources. 

I hope you have found these posts useful and that you will come back for new ones in the fall. Until then, I will repost some of the more popular posts from the archives!