I Went Browsing and This is What I Found . . .

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

When I was a little girl going on car rides with my parent and/or grandparents (sitting on the fold down arm rest in the front was always a treat albeit an apparent danger but it was the 70s, who knew?), aside from listening to show tunes, Barbara Streisand, Barry Manilow, and Frank Sinatra, we played car games. One of the family favorites was, “Going Shopping”. Each person would start with “I am going to Pathmark, Shop ‘n Bag, the A & P (fill in any supermarket of the 70s and 80s here) and I am going to buy (something that begins with an A). The next person would then go to the market and buy what the last person bought and then whatever comes next in the alphabet. It was always fun when people would buy these obscure or even funny-sounding or embarrassing items (my mother loved to throw a Kotex in the cart). And then of course having to remember everyone’s previous purchases was always a challenge, especially as we neared the latter part of the alphabet. Anyway, browsing around thinking about this blog post reminded me of that game and those fun car rides. And now, on to the point of the post!

Here is what I put in my cart today . . .

I went browsing and I found ClassHook. A great FREE site for finding movie and TV clips to use in your class for any topic. Search by decade, grade level, topic, series, and clip length. You can even check the box to leave out the profanity.

I went browsing and I found Edulastic, a great FREE too for formative assessment that integrates nicely with Google Classroom. Upload your own pre-made assessment, browse their library, create your own from a variety of question types, and you are good to go.

I went browsing and I found Formative an in-the-moment way to visually assess your students and give immediate feedback (which, as we know, immediate or timely feedback is best to correct misunderstandings). Like Edulastic, it’s FREE, you can create from scratch, you can browse their questions and add them to yours, and you can upload one you already have made as a doc or pdf and transform it by adding to it and allowing your students to answer right there. The best element is the ability for your students to draw their responses (great for math) and your ability to see all your students’ responses at the same time. Check. It. Out.

I went browsing and I found Infographics in Foreign Language Classes. If you teach a world language, you just might want to have your students share their research using an infographic. This post will explain how.

I went browsing and I found over 500 High School Math Videos. Mr. Robb is a high school math teacher who has created videos for his AP Calculus AB and Integrated 3 Math courses. His Xtranormal video on his home page introduces the idea of having the students watch the videos before they are introduced to the content in class so that they have an idea and familiarity when the teacher intros the topic (Flipped classroom model). For more help with PreCalc and Calculus, take a look at the 100+ videos from Mr. Berberian. He started making these before Khan Academy was a household name. Looking for Algebra or PreAlgebra help? My colleague has created more than 120 videos and several playlists teaching concepts and going through whole chapters to help his students. Check out the videos and playlists on his YouTube page.

I went browsing and I found Story Maps. If you have a location-based story or event, or series of events, what better way to tell it than through maps using pictures, videos, and text. StoryMaps is similar to Google’s Tour Builder.

I went browsing and I found the Visions of Education podcast episode 100, Teaching Racial Literacy and Controversial Issues with Genevieve Caffrey. I have the tab open and have started to listen and looking at the accompanying links and resources I already know it’s going to be good. Within the first fifteen minutes Caffrey talks about why teachers fear having these controversial conversations or discussions of current events in their classroom, which, if you were part of our recent in-service, much of what she says will sound familiar. Caffrey talks about the “risks of silence” in not having these conversations and how we can start using the acronym, LET’s ACT to start. We are currently reading Not Light, But Fire by Matthew R. Kay and discussing creating the safe, caring, trusting communities in our classrooms for having meaningful conversations (and then how to have them), and this podcast and it’s accompanying resources is a good pairing. Browsing the titles of the other episodes on the podcast I found episode 67, American Indians in Children’s Literature. I encourage you to look around and listen in. Great quotes from these episodes: “Who’s past and who’s future are we talking about?” and by not talking or learning about others’ perspectives, we may be inadvertently saying, “Some people’s experiences is not important or worthy of discussion.”

Read, Connect, Listen, Learn

Each week when trying to find things to share with my colleagues, I spend time clicking links in emails, opening links from Twitter, engaging in webinars, and reading different books on my Kindle. This week’s share pulls from all these places and comes with opportunities for everyone. Get comfy, there’s a nice amount coming your way.

Photo by Porapak Apichodilok on Pexels.com

First off is an opportunity to connect with other classes during World Read Aloud Day. World Read Aloud Day (WRAD) is just two weeks away, happening February 1st. Lit World has pulled together the many ways you, or you and your class can celebrate WRAD including connecting with an author via Skype. Additionally, Mike Soskil, a teacher whom I follow on Twitter and wrote about during the 2017 DITCHSummit has created this connections project that your students can do synchronously or asynchronously depending on what works for you. However you choose to participate, it will be a great way to share a love of reading with another class.

Photo by Mikes Photos on Pexels.com

Speaking of reading, next up is Common Lit: leveled reading passages, text sets, instructional materials, and text-dependent questions created by teachers for teachers and is FREE “because teachers shouldn’t have to pay.” Common Lit recently, they added literacy materials for third and fourth grade so now the literacy support materials go from third through twelfth grade! There are many ways to find what you need including a searchable library, search by book, genre, grade level, lit device, text set, or theme. You are going to want to browse their collection and do some looking around at everything they have; it’s quite robust!

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The other day EdCurrent offered a free webinar titled, “Moving from One-Size-Fits-All to a Universal Design for Learning”. I signed up and then watched the recording the next day, which, as a side-note is a great way to deal with webinars that you are interested in but may not be able to participate in when offered. In any event, the next day in my inbox, along with the “sorry we missed you” message was the link to both the recording and the resources.

A great quote to come out of the webinar is this one, “How can we maximize the amazing strengths that Ss have so that we can eliminate barriers and make everyone successful?” It made me think of Lea Waters who recently tweeted this, “We often ask ourselves the question ‘What is wrong with me?’ But when we ask ourselves the question ‘What is right with me?’, we start to get a fuller sense of who we are. We start to identify the #strengths and assets that really help us to thrive and reach our full potential.” Its up to us as educators to create an environment in our classroom where all Ss can feel successful. To learn more, check out the recording.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

If you like to watch videos to help with learning, then you will like Edutopia’s, research and science-based “How Learning Happens” video series. Currently there are 22 videos on topics like Cultivating a Belonging Mindset, Fostering Positive Relationships, Building Academic Confidence, and Developing Foundational Skills.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Lastly, if a child you know has anxiety, Renee Jain, a University of Pennsylvania MAPP (Master of Applied Positive Psychology) graduate and creator of the GoZen website (tools for dealing with anxiety and building resilience in schools and at home), now has a FREE podcast, Dear Anxiety. Jain and her guests share research-based solutions for “greater mental wellness for the whole family.” Currently there are four episodes, “Worrying about Worry”, “Tackling the Perfectionism Monster”, “Transforming Anger for Parents” and “Transforming Anger for Kids”.

Happy browsing!

“It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year”

birthday bow box card

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

If you are singing the song and thinking about the holidays, then you are partially correct. While this is not a post about the winter holidays as it is only nearly September, it is a post that brings “gifts”. These gifts, however, are in the form of great tools you can use and connections you can make right off the bat for the new school year ahead!

First off is the All New Educator’s Guide to Flipgrid 3.0. In early August, Fligrid launched a slew of updates including making it FREE to educators everywhere! Now you and your students can share your voices, connect with other classrooms, become epals, and co-pilot topics safely, securely, and easily. Just imagine using Flipgrid on one of the first days of school for students to share something they want you to know about them, goals for the start of the year, or a favorite poem.

Speaking of sharing, flattening classroom walls, and connecting, the 2018 Global Read Aloud will kickoff in just over a month on October 1. Join with over a million other students and teachers in reading one of this year’s selections.  Then use Flipgrid to share reflections, favorite passages, and messages about the book with other classrooms from around the globe.

Richard Byrne has recently released his Practical Ed Tech Handbook for the 2018-2019 School Year that you are free to view, download, and use in your classroom and schools. In it you will find tips for staying in touch with parents and students, ways to use online quiz platforms, tools for making stop-motion and documentary-style videos, and more.

As my school continues our implementation of Positive Education under the Positive Psychology umbrella, and schools are realizing the importance of promoting and facilitating a growth mindset in their learners and faculty, Learn Storm and Khan Academy offer these growth mindset lessons and activities for elementary, middle, and high school students that you can utilize with your free Khan Academy account.

Day one is coming or for some is already here. Here are three options for one-minute of retrievals from Pooja Agarwal you can use with your students to get them primed and ready to learn. These are simple, quick warm-ups you can easily implement that are research-based ways to deepen your students’ learning. You can subscribe for weekly updates, read about the research and download free guides and follow Agarwal on Twitter.

Lastly, while you are setting up your classrooms, taking a walk in the beautiful weather, or just like to listen to learn, then take a few (usually hovering around 5 – 10) minutes to listen to Matt Miller’s DITCH podcast. This will take you to a podcast about more ways to use Quizizz and if you scroll down, you can hear about Fliphunts (a mash up of Flipgrid and a scavenger hunt), changes to Google Classroom, Educator Goals and more.

Lucky 7

8187170652_bf6e3c2463_nWe recently became premium users of Screencastify, a screencasting tool that integrates extremely well with the Google suite of products. I love using my Screencastify extension to share instructions, how-tos, and more with my students and colleagues and it saves time for work during class if I am not performing a stand and deliver with the content. The students can proceed with the task at hand and if they need to, can revisit and re-watch the videos as often as helpful. With that being said, here is a list of educational uses of Screencastify that you might want to check out.

I don’t remember how I found this next site but am very glad I did! Curriculum Pathways is research-based technology resources for K-12 educators and students and they are FREE. You can browse the resources by grade, subject, or standard. You also have the ability to filter by discipline, grade level, type of resource: tools and apps, lessons, primary sources, etc.; compatibility to device: PC/Mac, iPad, tablet, iPhone, Chromebook; and 59 categories from Art & Architecture, to Trig, Spanish to Biochemistry, Modern Europeans to American Lit, Grammar to Statistics. There is nothing that is not included here on this robust site. Sign up- it’s FREE!

There is a new update to BookCreator that now allows for collaboration! Students and teachers can create books and get feedback in real time. This is part of their paid plan. With the free plan, one teacher can invite students to create up to 40 books for the class library ranging from portrait to square and landscape and comics in those same sizes. Did I mention that this is also browser-based?!

I have written and shared resources from Robert Kaplinsky before. Today I am sharing his Depth of Knowledge Matrix for Elementary Math.

This past week the Modern Learners webinar was on Learner Agency and asked, “Why do we do what we do, and How can we make learner agency a reality on our classrooms?” These webinars are always thought-provoking and make us take a hard look at our practices. You can listen to the recording here.

George Couros’ blog posts never disappoint and this one is no different. A hint of the gist of it is below.

“the best classroom management is always excellent teaching and learning.”

What would you do for a Klondike Bar? OK, that is not really what I am asking you. What can you do with 5-minutes? If you are like me, then you like to fill free time with something of substance. Be it reading, working out, phoning/texting a friend, tossing in a load of laundry, I like to make every minute count. Well now I have something else to do with that little bit of time. Matt Miller of DitchSummit and DITCH that Textbook now has a podcast! Yes, that’s right. In just about 5 minutes a day 5 days a week you can get great tips, tidbits, and inspiration that you can take right back to your classroom. The first 5 are here and each Tuesday, a recap of the previous podcasts will be right on his blog.