This Week’s Possibilities

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

“Opportunities are usually disguised as hard work, so most people don’t recognize them.”
Ann Landers

It always amazes me how many tabs I find myself with each week full of things to read, share, or try. I know I have said it before, but I am not a hoarder of things- my house is very organized- (though my children would say I have emotional attachments to some things)– I do tend to hoard my tabs until I am able to share them. And while I do use my One Tab extension when I am sharing a group of links on a particular topic with my students or colleagues, I keep the ones for my weekly share open as a visual reminder.

Many teachers at one point or another have their students participate in a group project. I use the term participate loosely as you will see in this post by John Spencer, The Four Biggest Pitfalls of Collaborative Groupings (and How to Avoid Them) that there are various forms of participation depending on the group’s individual members and their personalities. His post (which also has the podcast version included if you are more of an auditory learner) is full of great examples, strategies, and helpful videos like Collaboration vs. Cooperation, and The Seven Keys to Creative Collaboration (or more affectionately titled, Why Group Work Doesn’t Have to Suck). If you are one who either participated in group work as part of your PLC, your department, your grade level, or graduate class; or if you do any sort of group work with your students, this is one post you may want to take time to read/listen to/watch.

Who doesn’t love a good smackdown! Matt Miller posed variations had a tech smackdown during his #DITCHBook Twitter chat (every Thursday at 10PM Eastern) on this question, What are your best tips for using (GSuite tools, Flipgrid, Quizlet Live, Quizizz, Kahoot; , in your classroom and got countless responses. He culled them and put this post together, sorted by the three questions and I am sharing them here with you ICYMI. No need for FOMO here. So if you have been thinking about incorporating some new ideas into your repertoire, or have been thinking about trying a new tool, take some time to learn from fellow educators.

Continuing on the learning path, MCIU (Montgomery County Intermediate Unit) has some excellent offerings this fall that you might be interested in taking advantage of. You can filter through 12 different categories like Social Emotional, Equity and Diversity, Literacy, or you can just scroll to your heart’s content and see what catches your eye. If you really want to dive deep, there is this Universal Design for Learning Professional Learning Community (PLC) that will be run from mid-September through May.

Last is a fun extension to your Flipgrid, Padlet, and Epic books experiences. #EpicPals is now in it’s 5th year running and is brought to you by Sara Malchow. Each month there will be a new collection of primary and intermediate books available in Epic (you can use the app or the browser version) that you can search for using EpicPals. There is also an accompanying Google Doc for each month that has the books as well as both a link to the Padlet that goes with the particular book. You can read about getting started with EpicPals here then you will want to join in the fun with your students and the hundreds of others who are also participating.

For more great tips, tools, and articles like this one from Eric Sheninger, “Why It’s So Important for Teachers to Cultivate Their Own Resilience” check out this week’s Shipley PLN Lower and Middle School Edition.

Happy learning!

Noteables from UNC’s Positive Psychology Course

33287341235_8080bc4a28I recently completed and earned a certificate from the Positive Psychology Course offered by the University of North Carolina through Coursera. I took it as a follow-up and to enhance my understanding of the Positive Education pilot I participated in along with a group of colleagues this past January. Since psychology was my first love, taking this course was a natural next step for me.

As these are notes (often quotes) from the online lecture videos (and I tried to capture what was said), all are attributed to Dr. Barbara Fredrickson. Here are some highlights:

Emotions and Responses:

  1. Responses are a big part of emotions. You can’t have an emotion without having a response to that emotion, and how we interpret a situation is the place that turns an emotion into despair or hope.
  2. Negative emotions scream or jump out at us whereas positive ones are more subtle. We need to train ourselves to recognize and be intentional about seeing the neutral things in our lives as positive events.
  3. Feeling good can transform people for the better. They become more optimistic, resilient, and socially connected.

Resilience:

  1. Resilience is a resource that can grow, a muscle you can build.
  2. Positive emotions both build and enable resilience.
  3. The more resilient you are the better able you are to find positive emotions and then the more your resilience builds from there- it spirals.

Prioritizing Positivity:

  1. People who want to be happy prioritize parts of their day where they might be able to experience positive emotions.
  2. We need to put enjoyment on our “To-Do” lists and prioritize positivity, making it part of our daily routine.
  3. Those who prioritize positivity reap many benefits:
    1. they are better able to express appreciation,
    2. they build better relationships,
    3. are more resilient,
    4. report higher life satisfaction,
    5. have reduced depressive symptoms.

Positivity Resonance:

  1. Moments of connection between two people who are co-experiencing a positive emotion, “what I’m feeling is a little bit of what you’re feeling.”
  2.  People need to feel safe and experience real-time, sensory connection for positivity resonance to emerge. This is hard to do through texting.
  3. Emotions are contagious. Smiles are ways to draw out positive emotions of others, not just to express the feeling of the person who is smiling.
  4. Smiles are ways of making people feel they are on the same page and could serve as a way to create a moment of shared positivity.

Health Benefits:

  1. Experiences of connection affect the heart and it’s functioning.
  2. When vagus nerve is functioning well, it slows your heart and gives a healthy rhythm to it:
    1. better able to regulate attention, emotions, navigate social situations so can connect with people better
    2. day to day experiences with positivity resonance improves your vagal tone (cyclical, spirals)
    3. the more day to day positive emotions, the more connected and attune people felt;the more connected, better vagal tones
    4. when negative emotions become prolonged or a way of life, they are related to changes in the way the heart functions and body systems function (but take caution not to correlate negativity and your bad health!)
  3. Positive emotions and positive social connections are health behaviors as they increase cardiac vagal tones.

Ripple Effect:

  1. Whatever emotions we are putting out there, are the ones we are inviting others to feel.
  2. Emotions belong to everyone who is in the room.
  3. The way leaders express their emotions affects the team.
  4. Micro moments of connection are not just about our own health, but about giving health to others, radiating health towards others.
  5. If your eye is tuned towards making these moments of connection, you can make more of these moments come alive rather than skip over them.
  6. Rituals of expressing something we are appreciative of or looking forward to- helps warm up the room when people are getting together to work, have a meeting. Takes no time and it makes an impact on the day.

To learn more, I encourage you to check out this course on Coursera; it will be well-worth your time and effort!

photo credit: publicdomainphotography Slow Motion Water Droplet via photopin (license)