“Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally”

Hello friends! Thank you for stopping by to read about some great sites and tools. Please be sure to read to the end to see how you can get access to THOUSANDS of FREE e-books that you can use with your class. Trust me, you will want to start using this one right away.

First is a very lovely story about everyone’s favorite S word- Stress. It is a metaphorical story about how we can approach stress. I think you will enjoy it. Coincidentally, in the online course I am spending time with, I am reading about stress and stressors. In a nutshell, we all need a balance of stress and non-stress in our lives; if we reach a tipping point that moves us toward the negative (wherein we shut down, close down, are not open to new ideas or change) we need to find a way back by seeking ways of renewing ourselves (yoga, meditation, exercise, spending time with loved ones, giving back to others, etc). It is only through the restorative process of renewal will we be open to new ideas, more creative, and able to move towards our goals. Interestingly, a recent article by Dr. Robert Brooks (if you have never heard or read his work, he is fantastic. Visit his site linked above to hear some of his talks on resilience) talks about stress and mindsets. It will complement and validate the lovely story very well. 

Next is something very cool. I saw it on Twitter this afternoon (where else!) and I think it has a real place in the classroom. It’s called Periscope and it’s an app that allows one to broadcast a live-feed of themselves and what is around them. When used for good like @JudyArzt used it for today (and not like the girl in Florida who thought it would be a bright idea to share her post-party joy ride), this app can offer amazing opportunities to share learning with others. So, how can you use it? Well, first idea that comes to my mind is virtual field trips. You all go on great learning adventures- why not broadcast these to your Twitter followers & other classrooms who might not be able to go to Gettysburg, Ellis Island, the Chesapeake Bay, or the Insectarium! Let them learn along with you. Invite others to view your makerspace I-day inventions, or share your Painted Lady butterfly habitat. I think there are many possibilities to use this app AND to incorporate proper digital citizenship/positive digital footprint lessons at the same time.

By the way, if I have not recently told you about the power of Twitter, I have been remiss. I sent a tweet (a couple actually between Friday and Monday) looking for a class to do a virtual debate with our debate club. The response has been overwhelming and very kind. There have been over a dozen retweets, half dozen favorites. And a few teachers and edutopia bloggers who personally messaged me letting me know they are either trying to find a class in their school or are offering to help if I don’t find a class which, as of about 20 minutes ago, I did!! If you are not using Twitter as a personal learning network, please let me show you to the Kool Aid. 

OK, so here is another very useful idea that I saw via Edutopia and it is about Flipped Learning. Flipped Learning is when you share information with the students via either a video that you create about the lesson, or a video someone else creates, or share information with students about the lesson before they come to the class so that they have a little knowledge ahead of time and you can go deeper during class time. Well this article talks about ways to best do this, and shares an example of a video that the teacher and author of this article used with his 4th grade students prior to the first day of school. Why I think this particular video idea is a great one is that it introduced his students to him and his classroom and some of the first day procedures before they came to school. To me, this is a great way to reduce and alleviate some first day jitters. If nothing else, it gives the students a taste of the type and styles of learning to come.

Here is another great tool that you can use with your class starting today. It’s called Educanon and it is very similar to Zaption and Edupuzzle in that it allows you to create, borrow, use, edit, and share interactive educational videos with your students in order to Flip or formatively assess your students. While you can easily create your own “bulbs” which is what these learning videos are called, you can also choose to use a premade bulb like this one on multiplication and division using modeling. (while this teacher does not specifically call it “bar modeling” it is what he is demonstrating when he shows how to solve this problem), or this one on division as repeated subtraction or this one on fractions and decimals. 

While I was watching videos on Educanon, I found that there is a great site for  video math lessons called Math Antics that I think regardless if you use them to create interactive videos, they would be a great resource for homework help and reinforcing the lessons you are teaching like Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally PEMDAS or this one on long division.

Lastly, here is a site that you are going to LOVE. It’s called Zing and it offers thousands of free ebooks of popular trade books for you and your students from PK-high school to read simultaneously while allowing each student the ability to annotate and highlight, check the built-in dictionary for unfamiliar words, and you to assign books by topic, subject, theme, lexile reading level, guided reading level, and more. Take a look at Richard Byrne’s short video tour of Zing, then sign up. It’s FREE! Want to personalize your Zing and get a few extra options— for $10 for the year, you can select and assign different books to one, some, or all of your students rather than everyone reading the same book. 

Enjoy!

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Science, Google, Growth Mindset and More

“The most important attitude that can be formed is that of desire to go on learning.” ― John DeweyExperience and Education

In honor of Earth Day and because I am a huge fan of Zaption, here is a Zaption tour on the Super Powers of Trees. Share with your students as a whole class and use the questions as discussion prompts, or share via your Edmodo class page and have your kids take a look tonight for some Earth Day fun. Be sure to browse all the Tours available for your use or remixing!

If you are someone who loves Science, teaches Science, wants to learn more about how memory works, or are just a Physics buff, you will enjoy this post 15 Science YouTube channels Kids Love. These channels explain science, they are not just how tos.

New features are coming all the time to Google Classroom, and today I learned about a few more. Now teachers can invite other teachers to be part of their classroom (think student teachers, co-teachers, etc) making sharing what’s going on and multiple teachers assigning work (or knowing what work your students have from other teachers) that much easier. The next is the ability to create an assignment and save it as a draft to post later. If you have other ideas, Google is happy to listen so think about what you would need from Google Classroom and let them know.

While we are almost at the end of April, it is still poetry month and so I thought I would pass this along to you. More likely something you might be interested in for yourself, or if you are a high school English teacher you might want to share with your students. This is the Library of Congress’  Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature where you can hear authors like Margaret Atwood and Ray Bradbury reading some of their poetry and giving commentary along the way. For more poet interviews (including spotlights on Hispanic writers, African writers, and more) both recorded and written, see here.

Some of you have started using Thinglink with your students as a way for them to share information about a topic. Richard Byrne shares how you can use your Thinglink classroom account and the Remix feature (where you take a Thing that’s already been made and remix it your way so you are not starting from scratch) to create review lessons for your students. This post is specifically about using it for map review, but I can see it easily being used for other purposes around your curriculum (Science you can have an image the students need to label, English they can answer Qs about a novel, etc).

We talk regularly about formative assessments, but have you thought about having your students use photos, screenshots, screencasts, and videos to find out what your students learned or found interesting today? Take a look at this article from Edutopia to see how your students can share artifacts of learning using digital media.

This next post by The Nerdy Teacher is about The next best thing to being there. The Nerdy Teacher, aka Nicholas Provenzano, is a 9th grade English teacher. He was going to be out of class at a conference for a few days but wanted his students to go on in class as if he was still there. He created some screencast of himself reading 4 different Emily Dickinson poems that he then wanted students to discuss. Since he was not going to be in class, he had the students do a “Silent Discussion” using their Google Classroom stream as their platform. You can read about it here. What he saw was how much discussion and interaction happened around these poems both during classtime and after it ended. It went so much better than he thought that he wondered if he holds his students back during discussions by being too involved himself. So, if you are going to be out of school for a day or two, why not be there virtually instead! For more ways to have class discussions where everyone gets a chance to speak up, not just the ones raising their hands, try Todays Meet, or if your classroom is on Twitter, use a hashtag to have a class chat.

I have shared several articles and posts on Fixed v Growth Mindset and today I am sharing one more. This one however, is a lesson plan developed in partnership with Khan Academy and it can be used over a few days with your students. It incorporates videos, discussions, and hands-on activities that help your students see that they can make a difference in their own learning, understanding and intelligence. I think this would be a great set of mini lessons to do with your students as you approach the end of the school year because it can be used in part as a reflection of their learning while they share information with future students of your classroom.